What Would Chinggis Do?

Saturday dawned a beautiful morning the air was crisp and cool, all of Mongolia had just gotten up at 4 in the morning to watch the opening ceremonies of the London Olympics, and traffic was light.  It seemed an auspicious beginning for our 2012 field work.  The opening ceremonies for our fieldwork had never run so smoothly: Baatar had arranged for our favorite driver, Chukha, to meet us at our hotel at 9am to get an early start.  It would be a solid 6-8 hour drive to the first lake we wished to sample Oygi Nuur, 9am did not seem too early. Drs. Baatar and Sanaa plus an undergraduate student, Balja, packed Chukha’s Russian military van at an astounding 7am (does Chukha really get up that early?) allowing us to leave Ulaanbaatar less than 36 hours after we arrived.  It was truly unprecedented.

Chinggis seated at the front of the Mongolian Parliament. Photo: N. Pederson

We made several stops on our way out of town, additional groceries, toothpaste, fuel, bar oil for chainsaws and a fruitless search for distilled water (why would we think we could get that here?) but we were still headed out of the smog bubble that is UB before noon.  It was a bit later than I had hoped, but still remarkable given our previous trips when it had taken several days to resist the gravitational force of the city.  As we left UB and the smog behind, we began to see small signs of the countryside: a few gers (circular felt tents), small herds of sheep for sale, and a couple of trucks loaded with wool.  John, my new PhD student, even saw his first Mongolian horses.  We could literally taste the Mongolian countryside.

Tsagaan takhi in northern Mongolia. Photo: N. Pederson

But as we drove up the last rise out of the Tuul River valley, the van sputtered, then stalled.  Things seemed routine Chukha was under the van in no time complaining of a loose battery connection.  In 15 minutes we were back on the road. At the next rise, the van stalled again, and this time Chukha looked truly distraught.  The rest of us piled out of the van, had a picnic lunch, and watched Mongolia clouds.  Chukha emerged from under the van looking like his best dog had just died.  He couldn’t eat, didn’t want to talk.  His van had literally blown a gasket.

On our way back to UB, after a beer and a couple shots with Chukha, we did our best to keep our chins up.  After all, what would Chinggis do?  We would try again tomorrow.  Until then, here’s looking forward to dinner.

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